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Enter our FREE random giveaway to win a service for eight of Spring Bouquet dinnerware from Lenox China – designed by Kathy Ireland.
This gorgeous set is happy and fanciful in presentation. Along... Read more...

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Passover "Spring Seder" Plate
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13" Seder Plate laser cut in stainless and glass

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This Spring Seder Plate by artist Melanie Dankowicz is a celebration of the first signs of spring, lasercut from stainless steel. With elegant... Read more...

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Passover Recipe Substitute List 2015
By Eileen Goltz

Every year we  all try to convert a main stream recipe into a Pesach one only to discover that we don’t have a clue as to what to substitute for a chometz ingredient. This panic moment is why I started compiling my COMPLETE LIST OF PESACH SUBSTITUTES. While the list has remained... Read more...  

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Zachlawi

Zalkawi_300w Zachlawi -  you may not yet know the name, but you will. The Zachlawi Distillery is located on the Jersey Shore and has been in operation since 2004. Its spirits are all hand crafted in small batches, and certified OU... Read more...  



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Passover Recipe Substitute List 2015
By Eileen Goltz

Every year we  all try to convert a main stream recipe into a Pesach one only to discover that we don’t have a clue as to what to substitute for a chometz ingredient. This panic moment is why I started compiling my COMPLETE LIST OF PESACH SUBSTITUTES. While the list has remained fairly constant I'm lucky to have readers that always seem to send me new hints and tips every year. Here is my 2015 list. As always, if any reader has suggestions or other substitutions that they would like to share please let me know. ( This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )

A reader asked for a simple conversion to metrics chart so here are the equivalents:

1 teaspoon = 5 milliliters
1 lb = .45 kilograms
1 tablespoon = 15 milliliters
1 cup = .24 liters
1 oz = 28 grams

1 oz. baking chocolate (unsweetened chocolate) = 3 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder plus 1 tablespoon oil or melted margarine

16 oz. semi-sweet chocolate = 6 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder plus 1/4 cup oil and 7 tablespoon granulated sugar

14 oz. sweet chocolate (German-type) = 3 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder plus 2 2/3 tablespoon oil and 4 1/2 tablespoon granulated sugar

1 cup confectioners' sugar = 1 cup granulated sugar minus 1 tablespoon sugar plus 1 tablespoon potato starch pulsed in a food processor or blender

1 cup sour milk or buttermilk for dairy baking = 1 tablespoon lemon juice in a 1 cup measure, then fill to 1 cup with Passover nondairy creamer. Stir and steep 5 minutes

Butter in baking or cooking use pareve Passover margarine in equal amounts. Use a bit less salt

1 cup honey = 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar plus 1/4 cup water

Molasses

1 cup molasses =1 cup honey (and vice versa) now that theflavor will be different.

1 cup corn syrup = 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar plus 1/3 cup water, boiled until syrupy

1 cup vanilla sugar = 1 cup granulated sugar with 1 split vanilla bean left for at least 24 hours in a tightly covered jar

1 cup marshmallow cream/ 2.5 ounces =8 large marshmallows or 1 cup miniature marshmallows

1 cup of flour, substitute 5/8 cup matzo cake meal or potato starch, or a combination sifted together

1 tablespoon flour = 1/2 tablespoon potato starch

1 cup corn starch = 7/8 cup potato starch

1 teaspoon cream of tarter= 1 1/2 teaspoon lemon juice or 1 1/2 teaspoon vinegar

1 cup graham cracker crumbs = 1 cup ground cookies or soup nuts plus 1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 cup bread crumbs = 1 cup matzo meal

1 cup matzo meal = 3 matzoth ground in a food processor

1 cup matzoth cake meal = 1 cup plus 2 tablespoon matzo meal finely ground in a blender or food processor and sifted

3 crumbled matzo = 2 cups matzo farfel

1 cup (8 oz.) cream cheese = 1 cup cottage cheese pureed with 1/2 stick butter or margarine

Chicken fat or gribenes = 2 caramelized onions, Saute 2 sliced onions in 2 tablespoon oil and 2 tablespoons sugar. Cook until the onions are soft. Puree the onions once they are golden.

1 cup milk (for baking) = 1 cup water plus 2 tablespoon margarine, or 1/2 cup fruit juice plus 1/2 cup water

1 1/4 cup sweetened condensed milk =1 cup instant nonfat dry milk, 2/3 cup sugar, 1/3 cup boiling water and 3 tablespoons margarine. Blend all the ingredients until smooth. To thicken, let set in the refrigerator for 24 hours.

1 cup wine= 13 tablespoons water, 3 tablespoons lemon juice and 1 tablespoon sugar. Mix together and let set for 10 minutes.

For frying: Instead of chicken fat, use combination of olive oil or vegetable oil and 1 to 2 tablespoons pareve Passover margarine.

Eggs: Passover egg substitutes don't work quite as well as the chometz egg substitutes. For kugels, matzo balls, fried matzo and some cakes the recipes will probably be ok. However, if you want to avoid them (and I do) you can add one extra egg white and 1/2 teaspoon of vegetable oil for each yolk eliminated when baking. Use only egg whites as the dipping to coat and fry meats.

Italian Seasoning= 1/4 teaspoon EACH dried oregano leaves, dried marjoram leaves and dried basil leaves plus 1/8 teaspoon rubbed dried sage. This can be substituted for 1 1/2 teaspoons Italian seasoning.

Curry Powder = 2 tablespoons ground coriander, 1 tablespoon black pepper, 2 tablespoons red pepper, 2 tablespoons turmeric, 2 tablespoons ground ginger. Makes 2/3 cup.

Pancake syrup = use fruit jelly, not jam and add a little water to thin. I always like to combine the jelly and water in a microwave safe bowl and heat it gently before I serve it.

Seasoned Rice Wine Vinegar = 3 tablespoons white vinegar, 1 tablespoon white wine, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1/2 teaspoon salt. Mix to combine. Makes 1/4 cup

Rice vinegar = 3 tablespoons lime juice plus 2 teaspoons sugar

Cider vinegar = 2 tablespoons lemon juice plus 1 tablespoon orange

Hot pepper sauce = 3/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper plus 1 teaspoon vinegar

Flavored Vinegar = lemon juice in cooking or salad, grapefruit juice in salads, wine in marinades.

Water Chestnuts- substitute raw jicama

Orange liqueur = substitute an equal amount of frozen orange juice concentrate

You can mince the tops of green onions and use them in recipes that call for chives or use celery tops instead of parsley (who are we kidding, we always have parsley during Pesach)

Soy Sauce Substitute
This soy sauce substitute doesn't taste exactly like the real thing, but it makes a flavorful alternative for Pesach stir fry.
2 tablespoons beef broth
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 teaspoon oil
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
black pepper to taste
1/4 cup boiling water

Combine all the ingredients. At this point, you can either a) use the sauce as is, leaving for an hour to give the flavors a chance to blend, or b) for a thicker, richer sauce, boil the liquid until it is reduced by half, about 3 tablespoons. Store in a sealed container in the refrigerator. Makes 2/3 cup. Use the sauce within 3 - 4 days.

Homemade Passover Teriyaki substitute:

1/4 cup soy sauce substitue
1 cup water
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
5 tablespoons packed brown sugar
2 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoons potato starch
1/4 cup cold water

In a small saucepan combine all the ingredients EXCEPT the potato starch and water. Whisk to combine. Gently start to heat the mixture. In a separate bowl whisk together the potato starch water until smooth. Immediately whisk the mixture into the warming liquid and continue stirring and cooking just until the mixture starts to thicken, slightly. Immediately remove from heat and cool. Store, covered, in the refrigerator.

Cashew Sour Cream
It's creamy and you can use it in any recipe that calls for sour cream. It refrigerates well.

1 cup raw cashews (must not be roasted or salted)
1/4 teaspoon salt
1-2 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
1 small lemon, juice

Cover cashews with water and soak for a few hours, or overnight. Pour off all water, and place nuts in food processor. Add 1/4 cup cold water, salt, vinegar and lemon juice. Puree for 3-4 minutes or until completely smooth and creamy in consistency. Use in any recipe that calls for sour cream. Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to a week. Makes 1 cup.

1 egg= 1 ½ tablespoons water, 1 ½ tablespoons oil, 1/2 teaspoon potato starch 1/2 teaspoon baking soda. It works well for up to 2 eggs.

You can also try 1/4 cup of applesauce = 1 egg but only for some of the egg in a recipe.

Corn Syrub Substitute

2 cups white sugar
34 cup water
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
1 dash salt

Combine all ingredients in a heavy, large pan.Stir and bring to a boil.Reduce heat to a simmer and put cover on it for 3 minutes to get sugar crystals off the sides of the pan. Uncover and cook until it reaches soft ball stage.stir often.Cool syrup and store in a covered container at room temperature.

Oyster Sauce Substitute (great with fish).

1 mushroom/vegetable bouillon cube (or 1 tablespoon of the powdered stuff)
1/2 cup boiling water
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon potato starch
1 teaspoon cold water

In a sauce pan combine the bouillon, sugar and boiling water. Boil for 2 to 3 minutes. While it's boiling, in a cup combine the potato starch and cold water, mix to combine and add mixture to the boiling broth. Simmer, whisking constantly until the mixture thickens.

Chili sauce 1 cup = 1 cup tomato sauce, 1/4 cup brown sugar, 2 tablespoon vinegar, 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, dash of ground cloves and dash of allspice

A few more suggestions:

Instead of hamburger buns use portabella mushrooms

Instead of lasagna noodles use eggplant slices that you slice lengthwise and season with a bit of salt and pepper and grill or broil until just soften

Instead of mac and cheese use roasted cauliflower (cut into small pieces) tossed with a cheddar cheese sauce. Place in a greased pan topped with matzo meal mixed with Parmesan cheese

© Eileen Goltz Pesach substitutes 15

 
Zachlawi PDF Print E-mail

KosherBuzz

Zachlawi

Zalkawi_300w Zachlawi -  you may not yet know the name, but you will. The Zachlawi Distillery is located on the Jersey Shore and has been in operation since 2004. Its spirits are all hand crafted in small batches, and certified OU kosher. The line includes its premier product Arak (no we have not yet tried it) and several types of kosher for Pesach spirits.
The Zachlawi Distillery arose from the dream and passion to create the “Finest Arak in the World”. Our Master Distiller was mentored by a fine old man from the Middle East and entrusted with an age-old family recipe for creating Arak. Together they toiled tirelessly to create a superior Arak using only the finest, freshest and natural ingredients.

So what have we tasted?

Zachlawi Vodka Cappuccinos
Two distinct blends- one infused with Hazelnuts and Mocha: Yumm!

These are both 60 Proof Cappuccino blends of 5x distilled American Vodka and Columbian Coffee Beans.  The Hazelnut Cappuccino has the added flavors of Turkish hazelnuts and results in a sweet and nutty drink. It is lovely over ice, blended as a frozen beverage, or chilled and served in a liqueur glass. We plan to try it our chocolate vodka cake.  The mocha cappuccino offers a rich coffee flavor, and will be a favorite of the coffee lovers in your life. We can taste a bit of chocolate flavor…could it be?

Honey Pepper Whiskey
Did you know that in 2013 Whiskey overtook vodka as the #1 most popular spirit in the U.S.?  Zachlawi has come up with its own signature pour…Honey Pepper whiskey. The new blend is completely unique in every sip— it combines the taste of aged whiskey, and is infused with the sweetness of natural honey with a finish of chili peppers. Just like the Purim story, somewhat bitter with a sweet ending.

Follow Zachlawi on Twitter @Zachlawi, on Facebook, and on Instagram - or learn more about Zachlawi at Royalwine.com

Enjoy these spirited recipes:

Zachlawi Chocolate Float
2-3 scoops of chocolate ice cream
2 Tbsp. Zachlawi Vodka Cappuccino
3 Tbsp chocolate syrup
Seltzer, chilled

In a tall glass, mix chocolate syrup, seltzer, Vodka Cappuccino
Top with 2 or 3 scoops of chocolate ice cream
Finish with an optional dollop of  whipped cream and chocolate syrup for garnish
We think that this would make a fun Purim Seudah dessert addition.  If serving meat, just use parve ice cream and a whipped cream topping.

Chocolate Mocha Latte
2 ounces Zachlawi vodka cappuccino
4 ounces vanilla soy milk or dairy milk
3 Tablespoons chocolate syrup
2 ounces prepared and cooled strong coffee or espresso

Mix all ingredients well. Pour over ice

Optional garnish: Whipped cream; cinnamon or vanilla powder

Hot Orange Apple Toddy

Inspired by Sunny Anderson, The Food Network
Warm, comforting and wonderful in cool weather!

1/2 orange, halved
4 cloves
3 cups apple cider
2 cinnamon sticks
Zachlawi honey pepper whiskey, to taste
Whipped cream (optional)

Stud the orange halves with cloves. In a medium saucepan, bring the cider, cinnamon and oranges to a simmer. To serve, add a shot of whiskey to each cup or glass. Ladle in the hot cider and top with a generous dollop of whipped cream
4-6 drinks

Classic Whiskey Sour
This is the classic recipe with a Zachlawi twist!

6 ounces Zachlawi Honey Pepper Whiskey
3 ounces freshly squeezed lemon juice ( 2-3 lemons)
3 ounces freshly squeezed lime juice (3-4 limes)
6 ounces prepared simple syrup (see below)
Maraschino cherries for garnish

Directions
Combine whiskey, juices and syrup.  In a cocktail shaker, mix all ingredients and ice. Shake for 30-45  seconds and pour into glasses. Add a maraschino cherry and serve cold.

How to make simple syrup: Put 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water in a saucepan and simmer over medium heat until the sugar dissolves. Chill before using. By the way, simple syrup is a must have in the fridge. It is Passover friendly and works well in iced tea, lemonade and alcoholic beverages.

 
Dim Sum PDF Print E-mail

Chinese New Year

It's the year of the goat. . . and time for some kosher Dim Sum by guest columnist Lauren Stacy Berdy.

These recipes are excerpts from:

Remaining Kosher Volume Two: A Cookbook for All with a Hechsher in Their Heart
First Publication Volume One: July 2013 Publication
Volume Two: Summer 2015 UDJ Productions
©2015 Lauren Stacy Berdy, All photos © 2015 John White

I have a fondness for Chinese food. Perhaps it’s part of my DNA? These dim sum recipes continue the Kosher Chinese conversation that I started in Remaining Kosher Volume One: A Cookbook for All with a Hechsher in Their Heart.

The Chinese have a fondness for displaying their ingenuity in food making.
Small tastes were never more delightfully construed.
Dim sum are small, wise bites of food that can also accomplish the business of a meal.
We aren't talking complicated. These delicious tastes are all simple to master.
The recipes form some kind of divine duo.
Or, make one, then another time try one of the others.
The preparation of dim sum can easily slip into your kosher repertoire.
No authentic ingredients were forfeited in the making of these small wonders.

One Filling, Two Dim Sum
"Pearl Balls" and "Flower Dumplings"

This is a fun and easy recipe. The same meat filling is used to make a couple different, delicious Chinese dim sum.

The first dim sum is a classic named "Pearl Balls." A miniature meatball is formed by rolling, then rolled again in water-soaked rice. After the dumplings are steamed, the rice glistens pearl-like about the meatball's surface.
The second dim sum is a partially open face dumpling using a traditional dumpling skin. Rice is added into to the filling and placed in the middle of the dumpling skin. Before steaming, the filling is partially wrapped in the skin, but not fully enclosed on the top- a delightfully easy way to form a dumpling. I think this dim sum resemble flowers!

Both dumplings rapidly come together: we aren't talking complicated. If you can make a meatloaf, you can prepare these dumplings. Once learned, these techniques will become good friends. If you don't have a steamer, just follow the instructions below to improvise one using a disposable aluminum pie plate.

There are many varieties of rice. This recipe uses round rice (also known as short grain or pearl grain) that you might know as dessert rice. Round rice is a staple of many cultures: find it on most grocer's shelves. When cooked, the individual raw, rounded rice grain always remains whole and individual. These reasons and more are why the Chinese use round rice in many of their dim sum.

The filling does not ask for much of your time. Ground turkey is used with a few choice easy to find inclusions.

Dried shiitake mushrooms are not hard to find. While many specialty markets carry them, buying shiitakes in most oriental stores may net a better and less expensive mushroom. Look for caps that are bursting with cracks from being so fat. like any dry mushroom, these need a soaking. Then the soaking liquid is used during the braising. Once cooked, shiitakes yield a complicated, savory taste that is meatier than any mushroom. These mushrooms add not only taste but texture to the filling. Everything else in the recipe is within easy reach at the supermarket. I enjoy eating my dumplings dipped in rice vinegar mixed with soy sauce. This bright tasting dip will bring out all the flavors.

You can prepare and steam either dumpling a few hours before serving, when they can easily be re-steamed.

Pearl Balls


One_Filling_Two_Dim_Sum_photo_4_Mobile

Pearl Balls Ingredients
1½ cups raw round grained rice: water to cover, soaked for an hour
2 tablespoons cornstarch

Braised Mushroom Ingredients
4 large or 5 small dried shiitake mushrooms:
soaked in 2 cups baby-bottle-warm water for an hour
2 tablespoons dark soy
½ teaspoon sesame oil
½ teaspoon sugar

Dumpling Filling Ingredients
¾ lbs. ground turkey
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon salt
3 garlic clove, peeled
(1) one inch piece ginger: peeled and roughly chopped
10 celery leaves: washed and checked
2 stalks of celery (inner whiter stalks): washed, checked, roughly chopped
½ cup carrots, julienned (store bought for convenience)
2 green onions: washed, checked and sliced into thirds
⅓ cup sliced water chestnuts, chopped
1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Vinegar Dip Ingredients
½ cup rice vinegar
½ cup soy sauce

Method to make Pearl Balls
Soak the rice. Adding enough water to cover for at least an hour. Set aside.
To prepare the braised mushrooms: take the mushrooms out of the soaking liquid. Squeeze each mushroom over and into the soaking water. Cut the mushroom stems off with kitchen scissors or a knife. Cut each mushroom into ¼" slices.
Pour all the soaking liquid into a small saucepan. Add in the sliced mushrooms, soy, sesame oil and sugar.
Braise the mushrooms uncovered on a low simmer for 25 minutes or until 1 tablespoon of liquid remains.
Scrape out the mushrooms and remaining liquid into a small bowl. Cool.
Once the braised mushrooms are room temperature, you may begin assembling the dumpling filling.
Put the ground turkey in a mixing bowl. Pour the soy sauce over the turkey. Refrigerate.
Prime all the other ingredients.
Prepare the vegetables for the food processor.
Pull off at least 10 celery leaves: wash and check.
Use two of the interior, whiter, shorter celery pieces with leaves attached. Roughly chop the tender celery stalk.
Measure out the julienned carrots.
Slice the green onions into thirds.
Place the following ingredients into the food processor bowl: the sliced braised mushrooms and any liquid, garlic cloves, roughly chopped ginger, celery leaves, celery stalks and leaves, carrots and green onion. Process for 15 seconds. Scrape down the sides. Process for another 5 seconds.
Add in the water chestnuts. Process just until they are mostly broken up.
Scrape the minced ingredients over the ground turkey and soy sauce.
Add in the rice wine vinegar and sesame oil.
For at least 15 seconds, use wet hands to knead the ingredients into the ground turkey.
Refrigerate for 15 minutes or overnight.
Wash hands with soap and water.

Finishing
To make a pearl ball:
Line a cookie sheet with plastic wrap or foil.
Drain the rice. Discard the rice water.
Put the rice in a meat mixing bowl. Mix the rice with the cornstarch.
Take out the seasoned meat. Roll the meat into walnut size meatballs.

Put a single rolled meatball into the bowl of rice. Roll and rock the bowl about until rice grains cling to all sides of the meatball.

Use your hands to gently reshape the ball into rounds. Place ¼" apart into the steamer basket (pie plate). Continue until the baskets (pie plates) are full.
Place the remaining Pearl Balls on a lined cookie sheet and refrigerate.


Steaming
Dim_Sum_Steaming_MobileFill a steamer pot with water and bring to boil.
Or if making a steamer: punch 8 evenly spaced holes in the bottom of the disposable pie plate. Place the pie plate so it fits snugly atop a pot of boiling water. Wet and wring out a non-lint kitchen towel. Set aside.

Brush the streamer tray/pie plate with vegetable oil. Repeat with each steaming.
Place the steamer tray (or pie plate and damp kitchen towel covering the dumplings) over the boiling water. Steam for 30 minutes.
Have a plate or pan ready to receive steamed dumplings.

Remove cooked pearl balls out of the steamer.
Prepare more pearl balls and steam, as needed.
Once cool, all steamed rice balls can stored "flat," sealed and refrigerated.
Reheat by steaming for 2 minutes over boiling water.
Dipping Sauce
Combine the vinegar and soy. Stir. Divide and place in small bowls for each diner.
Serving
Place the dumplings on a warm plate- or just serve from the steamer.
Make sure a small bowl of dip is at each place setting.
Note: If the cooked dumplings are cold from the refrigerator: reheat by steaming for 2 minutes.

Yield: 8 servings
Special Equipment: sauce pan, bowls, ½ sheet pan or cookie sheet, foil, steamer (or a disposable aluminum pie plate to improvise a steamer), a clean non-lint kitchen towel for the disposable steamer

**********************************************
"Flower" Dumplings

One_Filling_Two_Dim_Sum_photo_5_Mobile

Ingredients
½ cup raw round grained rice: soaked for an hour, water to cover

Braised Mushroom Ingredients
4 large or 5 small dried shiitake mushrooms: soaked for an hour
in 2 cups baby-bottle-warm water
2 tablespoons dark soy sauce
½ teaspoon sesame oil
½ teaspoon sugar

Dumpling Filling Ingredients
¾ lb. ground turkey
½ tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon salt
3 garlic cloves, peeled
(1) one inch piece ginger: peeled and roughly chopped
10 celery leaves: washed and checked
2 stalks of celery (inner whiter stalks) washed and checked, roughly chopped
½ cup carrots, julienned (store bought for convenience)
2 green onions: washed, checked and sliced
¼ cup sliced water chestnuts, chopped
1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
1 teaspoon sesame oil

Vinegar Dip Ingredients
½ cup rice vinegar
½ cup soy sauce

Flower Dumplings Method
Soak the rice. Adding enough water to cover for at least an hour. Set aside.
Prepare the braised mushrooms: take the mushrooms out of the soaking liquid. Squeeze each mushroom over and into the soaking water. Cut the mushroom stems off with kitchen scissors or a knife. Cut each mushroom into ¼" slices.
Pour all the soaking liquid into a small saucepan. Add in the sliced mushrooms, soy, sesame oil and sugar.
Braise the mushrooms uncovered on a low simmer for 25 minutes or until 1 tablespoon of liquid remains.
Scrape out the mushrooms and remaining liquid into a small bowl. Cool.
Put the ground turkey in a mixing bowl. Pour the soy sauce over the turkey. Refrigerate.
Prime all the other ingredients.
Prepare the vegetables for the food processor.
Pull off at least 10 celery leaves: wash and check.
Use two of the interior whiter, shorter celery stalks with leaves attached. Cut each tender celery stalk in three.
Measure out the julienned carrots
Slice the green onions into thirds.
Place the following ingredients into the food processor bowl: the sliced braised mushrooms and all liquid, garlic cloves, roughly chopped ginger, celery leaves, celery stalks and leaves, carrots, and green onion. Process for 15 seconds. Scrape the sides. Process for another 5 seconds.
Add in the water chestnuts and carefully process until they are mostly broken up.
Scrape out the minced ingredients and spread over the ground turkey and soy sauce.
Add in the rice wine vinegar and sesame oil.
For at least 15 seconds, use wet hands to knead the ingredients into the ground turkey.
Refrigerate for 15 minutes (or overnight for later use).
Wash hands with soap and water.

Finishing
Cover the surface of a ½ sheet pan with foil.
On a flat working surface, lay out 10 dumpling skins whiter side down (if using traditional made skins).

Place a well-rounded tablespoon of filling into the middle of each dumpling by pushing the filling off the spoon with one finger.

Gather the edges of the skin around the filling, surrounding it but leaving the top open.

Place each dumpling onto the foiled surface of the sheet pan.
Prepare more flower dumplings as needed.

Use the back of a fork that has been freshly dipped in water to smooth, press and level the fillings surface.
The dumplings are ready to be cooked or refrigerated.
To refrigerate: Cover the dumplings with a damp kitchen towel, then seal with plastic wrap. Refrigerate up to 8 hours.
To freeze: place raw dumpling on the sheet pan. Freeze. Once frozen, place into zip locks.
Any remaining dumpling skin(s) and filling can be separately sealed and frozen.
If cooking now, proceed with the steaming.

Steaming
Fill a steamer pot with water and bring to boil.
Or if making a steamer: punch 8 evenly spaced holes in the bottom of the disposable pie plate. Place the pie plate so it fits snugly a top a pot of boiling water. Wet and wring out a non-lint kitchen towel. Set aside.
Brush the streamer tray with vegetable oil. Repeat for each all steaming.
Place the steamer tray(s) (or pie plate covered with a damp non-lint kitchen towel covering the dumplings) over the boiling water. Steam for 30 minutes.

Dipping Sauce
Combine the vinegar and soy. Stir. Divide and place in small bowls for each diner.

Serving
Place the dumplings on a warm plate- or just serve from the steamer.
Make sure a small bowl of dip is at each place setting.
If cooked dumplings are cold from the refrigerator: reheat by steaming for 2 minutes. Yield: 8 servings

 

Mushroom Peanut Rice Dumplings
& Chinese Turnip Cake

Vegetarian Mushroom Peanut & Rice DumplingsMushroom_Peanut_Rice_Dumpling_photo_5_Mobile

The crafting of dumplings clearly comes into the Dim Sum picture, front and center.
Most dumplings are simple to reproduce, and that's the point. The idea is to make many of these babies, so there will be many to eat!
This particular dumpling has coloring book sensibility. However, these dumplings need your willingness to get crafted.
Hands are the tools here: I am committed to getting you to use yours.
These particular dumplings are vegetarian and the recipe has been in my repertoire for many years.
This filling does not resemble the familiar ground "meatloaf" formula. But it still tastes mighty savory, flavorful and meaty.
This is due in large part to a few dried shitake mushrooms. They provide the meaty mouth feel resulting in a gloriously rich texture that you finally bite into.
Chinese dried mushrooms first get soaked, then simmered in their soaking water along with other off the shelf ingredients.
The raw peanuts cook inside the same pot and will lose their crunch, becoming a tender vegetable.
Round rice (also known as dessert rice) is a starchier rice. You will find it on the same shelf as the rice you already buy. It is a staple in many parts of the world.
These vegetarian dumplings can either be steamed or pan-fried.
Here what I know: dumplings are happy food anyway they get cooked.
How very nice of you to make them! Any extra filling and dumpling skins can be frozen. See method below.
Note: my preferred kosher dumpling wrappers are Twin Marquis brand. Look for them in the frozen section in your neighborhood kosher markets.
Dried Chinese mushrooms are ubiquitous in Asian cooking. Find them wherever Asian foods are sold. Look for the fat one with cracks on their caps. Buy the small ones they are cheap and cheerful.

Ingredients
½ cup "round" rice: soaked in water to cover for at last 1 hour, drained
8 large (or 12 small) dried black mushrooms, soaked in 3 cups
of baby bottle warm water for 1 hour
½ cup dark soy sauce
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1 tablespoon sugar
1 cup raw peanuts (no skins): soaked overnight in water to cover, drained
½ cup sliced water chestnuts, coarsely chopped
(1) 2"piece of ginger, peeled and grated
3 tablespoons cilantro: washed, checked and chopped
3 green onions: washed, checked and thinly sliced
Romaine lettuce leaves for steaming: washed and checked (see cooking section)

Garnish
cilantro leaves for sprinkling: washed and checked
Yield: about 48 dumplings
Special Equipment: small mixing bowl, paring knife or kitchen scissors, saucepan with cover, food processor, medium mixing bowl, baking sheet, non-lint kitchen towel, skillet and cover (non-stick if available), cooking spatula, baking sheet

Method
Lift and squeeze out the mushrooms from their soaking water. Use a small knife or scissors to remove the tough stems and discard.
Drain the rice and discard its water. Drain the peanuts and discard its water.
Put the mushroom caps into a sauce pan; add in all the mushroom soaking liquid, rice, soy sauce, sesame oil, sugar and peanuts.

Cover and simmer on low for at least 50 minutes (or until about ¼ cup of liquid is left). Scrape cooked ingredients and liquid into a bowl. Set aside for ½ hour.
Use a food processor to chop the cooked mushroom-rice-peanut mixture and all remaining cooking liquid. Blend until all is ground into smaller pieces.
Remove and scrape into a mixing bowl.
Add in the chopped water chestnuts, grated ginger, cilantro and sliced green onion. Mix well.
At this point the filling can be refrigerated for up to 3 days.
or
For now, leave out the cilantro and the green onions. The mixture can then stay refrigerated for about ten days.
Don't forget (to add) the cilantro and the green onions when doing the finishing!

Finishing
Line a sheet pan with a non-lint kitchen towel. Combine the cornstarch and water in a bowl and mix until blended: this will be the dumpling's glue. Unseal dumpling wrappers and remove 10 of them.Wet a paper towel and then wring it out. Lay over all the other dumpling skins.
Lay the 10 dumpling skins "white" (cornstarch) side down on your work surface.
Use a pastry brush to lightly brush the edges of each dumpling skin with the cornstarch "glue."
Place a well-rounded teaspoon of filling in each center. After cleaning your hands, fold one wet edge over to the other.
Pick the dumpling up from the folded center and place in the palm of your non-working hand.

Using your working hand, grasp the open edges between your work thumb and index finger. Firmly pinch the dumpling, almost pulling up the edges as you seal. The dumpling skin is elastic, but not a rubber band. Treat them firmly but kindly.
Place the sealed dumplings on the lined baking sheet. Repeat.
To freeze all the other dumpling skins: seal any remaining dumpling skins in plastic wrap, then place into a zip lock. Freeze. You will need to thaw the dumpling skins in the refrigerator the night before using.
Filled dumpling are best cooked and eaten the same day they are made.
The prepared dumplings can be made up to 8 hours before cooking if refrigerated uncovered.
But uncooked dumplings can be frozen, if necessary or convenient. Place on a kitchen towel lined cookie sheet, freeze, then one by one place the dumplings into zip lock bags. Do not thaw before cooking.
Cook the un-thawed dumplings using the following methods. Increase the cooking time as needed.

Steam Cooking the Dumplings
To steam: prepare a baking sheet lined with a non-lint kitchen towel. Prepare a steaming pot: add water and bring to a simmer.
Line the steamer basket with lettuce leaves: this prevents the dumplings from sticking.
Cut the rib of the lettuce leaves. Line the inside the bottom of the steamer with the soft green leaves. It doesn't have to be perfect
You don't want the dumplings to touch while steaming, so place accordingly.
Steam the dumplings for 20 minutes.
Remove steamed dumplings and place onto prepared sheet pan.
Cover with plastic wrap. Repeat, reusing the same lettuce leaves.
To reheat: steam for 3 minutes

Serving Steamed Dumplings
Assemble the dumplings on platter. Garnish with fresh coriander leaves.
My husband eats at least 6, I eat 4...
You can plop the cooked dumplings into the chicken soup, too!

*****************************************
Pan Frying the Dumplings

Set the oven to 200 ºF. Get out a non-stick (if available) frying pan with a cover. Have a sheet pan ready to receive the cooked dumplings.
Measure out ¼ cup of tap water. Get out the vegetable shortening.
You will need a cooking spatula.
Use a paper towel to wipe the skillet with a film of vegetable shortening.
Heat the frying pan to moderate.
The dumpling should make a noise when they hit the hot surface. Arrange so the dumplings so that they don't touch.
Cook until the dumplings are golden brown underneath- about 45 seconds.

Use the spatula to flip them over. Immediately pour in ¼ cup water onto the surface of the pan and cover.
Cook on moderate heat until all the liquid is practically absorbed: about 2 minutes. Remove the lid and cook 30 seconds more (or until crisp).
Remove the skillet from heat. Use the spatula to place the cooked dumplings on the baking sheet. Keep warm in oven (200 ºF) while you continue cooking. Repeat (as needed).

Serving
Arrange the dumplings on a serving platter. Sprinkle with coriander leaves and serve.
As mentioned before, my husband eats at least 6, I eat 4...

 

Chinese Turnip Cake

Chinese_Turnip_Cake_7_Mobile

This is my own interpretation of this classic Dim sum. You won't believe what a turnip can become! I bow lowly to those ancient Chinese cooks who made this combination of tastes and textures possible.

Turnips are given a star turn here and shine under the spotlight. Shredded raw turnips are partnered with round starchy rice that has been soaked. They will get ground and then mixed with a small cast of easy to find inclusions.

The corn beef can easily be justified as a solid credible player though not essential it lends another note to this unusual troupe of ingredients.

The recipe can easily be recast in the vegetarian role. The combined elements are steamed in a loaf pan, cooled, unmolded and sliced.

A final cooking in a lightly greased pan allows the famous crusty exterior to appear.

Ingredients
1½ short grained (round) rice: soaked overnight in water to cover
1½ cups of peeled turnips, finely shredded
2 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil
5 scallions, thinly sliced
2 sandwich slices of corn beef (such as Aaron's), chopped
option: leave out to keep vegetarian
½ cup chopped, raw, skinless peanuts
option: leave out if allergic

2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon ground pepper
2 teaspoons sesame oil (more vegetable oil if excluding)
2 tablespoons vegetable oil

for cooking:
vegetable shortening

Garnish:
1 green onion: washed checked and sliced

Yield: 6 servings
Special Equipment: standing blender or food processor, rubber spatula, mixing bowl, wax paper or parchment paper, plastic wrap, steamer, disposable loaf pan, paper towels, frying pan (non-stick if available)

Method
Keep a ¼ cup of rice water. Drain (and discard) the remaining water. Scrape into a standing blender or a food processor. Add the ¼ cup of water and grind rice until it is almost a paste. Stop the machine as needed to stir.

Add in the grated turnips to the rice paste.

Process and blend for thirty seconds. Stop the machine to stir as needed. The rice and turnips needs to be pasty, but not smooth.

Scrape contents into a mixing bowl.

Cook the scallions until wilted in 2 tablespoons of vegetable oil.

Combine and stir the scallions and all its cooking oil in with the ground rice and turnips. Stir in the optional peanuts.

Cooking the Turnip Cake
Cut a piece wax or parchment paper so it is long enough to extend end to end inside the loaf pan. Brush the entire inside (paper and all) with the vegetable and sesame oil. Scrape in the blended rice and turnip mixture. The mixture is ready for steaming.

Seal the cake pan tightly with saran wrap. Set on a rack of a steamer.

Steam tightly lidded for an hour and a half over gently boiling water.

As in baking a cake, the mixture is finished when a toothpick comes out clean. Cool to room temperature.

Refrigerate for at least 5 hours. This turnip cake can stay refrigerated for 1 week.

Finishing
Slip the cake from its mold. Slice finger-thick slices.
Get out a frying pan.
This technique is called a shallow fry. Add in enough vegetable shortening so it just about pools in the pan.
Get the skillet hot.
The turnip cakes should make noise as they slip in. Do not crowd the pan.

Cook until crisp and brown- about 1½ minutes. Turn and repeat.

Serve immediately.
or
To reheat
: get a dry skillet hot. Place a few sliced cakes back into the pan. Heat on one side, then the other to re-crisp.

Serving
Shingle the turnip cake slices on a platter.
Sprinkle the slices with the green onions.

Notes:
This steamed cake can be made five days beforehand, then browned the day of your event.
Corn beef can be excluded to make a vegetarian cake.
Peanuts can also be excluded due to allergies.

 
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KosherBuzz

The Deli Man Recipes

KennyandZiggy

We were delighted and excited to introduce the new documentary Deli Man at the Atlanta Jewish Film Festival. The film, by Erik Greenberg Anjou is a mouthwatering experience. After viewing the movie, we explored the Internet to find some of the delicious recipes that Ziggy Gruber serves at his popular Houston Deli, Kenny & Ziggy's. Since the deli is not presently kosher certified, and since we don't live in Houston, we hope to prepare some of these at home. . . unless we can convince the lovable, hardworking Chef Ziggy Gruber to come to Atlanta and cook with us! http://www.delimanmovie.com

 

Ziggy's Kasha Varnishkas
Kenny and Ziggy's Egg Salad
Award Winning Chicken Soup Recipe from Kenny & Ziggy's Deli
Kenny & Ziggy's Matzo Balls
Kenny & Ziggy's Stuffed Cabbage

 
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KosherBuzz

The World of Hip Hop
& Bartenura Moscato

The most popular kosher wine after Manischewitz is now the toast of the hip-hop world. Bartenura Moscato, the light, sweet white wine that is low alcohol and comes in a striking blue bottle, is now one of the biggest sellers among African American and Hispanic consumers. (In the 80s and 90s, 85-95% percent of the consumers of the kosher wine were Jewish, according VinePair.) Bartenura_Moscato_Hip_hop_240w

The wine has been lovingly dubbed Bartenura Blue.
Read more at jewcy.com and jewishbusinessnews.com.

 
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The National Aquarium in Baltimore:

What's Kosher?

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If you need a family friendly destination, one that is both educational and fun for all ages –and you are visiting the Washington area, we suggest The National Aquarium in Baltimore. Some members of our family (ages 1-9) along with their parents recently visited the aquarium. Their Hanukkah assignment - have as much fun as possible, and report on the kosher fish. (Yes, one of my grandchildren was also on a search for sharks).

fish_3crWe thank our roving reporters (Shaya, age 9, Sara, age 8, and their younger siblings) for  getting  the fish facts and for this story:

The Baltimore Aquarium has many fish, some kosher and some not. Scary looking sharks, snakelike eels, sawfish with big noses, huge sturgeons, and piranhas with big teeth are all not kosher. All kosher fish have fins and removable scales. These don't. As the roving reporters for KosherEye, we were concentrating on the kosher fish.

Now about our kosher finds:
Kosher fish come in a lot of different shapes, colors, and sizes. The Black Banded Rainbowfish is kosher, but not worth eating at 2.5 inches long. Redbreast Sunfish, as you can tell from its name, are red. They grow to 10 inches long. The Yellow-faced Angelfish is a yellow and blue fish
that is 14 inches long.

The next time you go scuba diving in the Chesapeake Bay, try to find a Summer Flounder. You say it's impossible? Well, you almost got it. You might have seen one without knowing it. Flounder are very good at camouflage. They look like gravel on the ocean floor. Believe it or not...a fully-grown Summer Flounder grows to 3 feet.

Barramundi_300W
More impressive than the small little fishies, are Crevalle Jacks. They grow to 6 feet long and are very fast (and delicious). At the aquarium, they were swimming with the sharks. Barramundi are bigger than the Crevalle Jacks and can grow to 6.5 feet long. They swim in the waters near Australia. Striped Bass and Rockfish are the same size as Crevalle Jacks. They can be found right in our own backyard, since we live near the Chesapeake Bay, but their population is decreasing because of pollution-- so don't eat too many.

The National Aquarium was fun and we learned a lot. Maybe you should go there soon. But after all this we still have a question. If a Bucktooth Tetra (a scale eating fish) ate all the scales off another kosher fish, would the fish still be kosher? (Guess we'll have to ask our father, the Rabbi!)

 
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Kosher Food Fest in Minnesota, Jan. 11, 2015

Food_Fest

On January 11th, 2015, Temple of Aaron will host their first annual Crossriver Kosherfest, bringing together local kosher options including caterers, small shops, and other venues to raise awareness of kosher possibilities. In addition to offering many food choices, they will host sessions/classes to teach about eating kosher and brainstorm on how they can expand the market.

According to Rabbi Jeremy Fine, one of the organizers, “The final element of this event is to offer an opportunity to encourage the twin cities communities to get together.  St. Paulites and Minneapolisites rarely have a reason to travel to the other side of the river. This day of eating and learning will offer an enhanced social dynamic for young and old to mix and mingle. We hope food will bond us together and people will make the 10 minute drive.”

More kosher food options would mean so much to the Jewish communities of Minnesota. “We invite everyone in the area to check out Crossriver Kosherfest. It should be a lot of fun for all ages. If you are a vendor or individual who wants to attend or be involved feel free to reach out to me, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it for more details.”

Below is the growing list of vendors:
Milts Kosher BBQ (Chicago), Aviv Vodka, Baldinger Bakery, Breadsmith
Bogarts Doughtnuts Co., Funky Chunky, Jezreel Wines (Israel), Just Truffles
Menchies. National Choice Bagels, Nothing Bundt Cakes, Rishi Tea (Wisconsin)
Rita’s Italian Ice, Sholom Catering, Spirit of Asia Catering, Temple of Aaron’s In House Caterer, Vitalis Kosher Bistro

For more information: http://tcjewfolk.com/event/crossriver-kosherfest/

 

KosherEye Note:
"The food purveyors are under various kashruth certifications. Do check with your Rabbi."

CrossRiver Kosherfest is not associated or affiliated with Kosherfest, The World's largest B2B Trade Show for the Kosher Industry held annually at The Meadowlands, NJ.

 

 
Shlomo's Back PDF Print E-mail

SD_square_logo_72dpi_250W

SHLOMO'S BACK! Direct from Broadway, the new production of Soul Doctor, The Musical Journey of Shlomo Carlebach has been completely re-imagined, involving the audience as an integral part of the "Shlomo Experience."
This new production has been re-staged in an intimate, historic synagogue, the Actors Temple Theatre by director Mindy Cooper. "Filled with songs you will be singing long after you leave the theater", the new Soul Doctor invites the audience to become part of the extraordinary life story of Shlomo Carlebach -- father of contemporary Jewish music and 20th century spiritual guru.

The new production of Soul Doctor stars Jewish pop sensation Josh Nelson as the legendary Shlomo.

http://www.souldoctorbroadway.com

Follow Soul Doctor on Facebook (SoulDoctorBroadway) and on Twitter (@SoulDoctor)

 
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Kosher Food Blogger's
Conference

KFB-Collage_250w 

The mission of the third annual Kosher Food Blogger Conference is to educate kosher food bloggers and vendors on how to enhance the value of their blogs and overall brands through best practices, sponsorships, technology and partnerships. The Conference programming is built around the topics that are crucial for building an education on social media, photography, writing, branding, marketing, and technology in our current environment.

When: Monday, November 10, 2014
Where: Chabad at NYU 353 Bowery, NYC
Time: 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Register for the conference here: http://kosherfoodbloggers.com

KosherFeast


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After the conference, grab a cab and head over to KosherFeast, the Social Media Networking Dinner at the Streit's Building, which follows the conference at 5:30pm.
Register for KosherFeast here: 
Reservations are now open:
Dinner tickets will include an option to tour the Streit's building and a brimming swag bag!
Tickets available on Eventbrite. (All past events have been sold out - so hurry!)

 
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Holiday Recipes
By Guest Columnist
Cindy Hodkin

Welcome to SIFTED. I consider myself a reformed attorney and currently give kosher cooking classes. We cook with the seasons, utilizing herbs and vegetables fresh from my garden that make you feel fresh and light in the summer, warm and fuzzy in the winter. Right now, we are cooking for the holidays and we hope that you will incorporate these the recipes into your repertoire!

Braciole, (pronounced bra-jiole) which is a classic Italian, rolled and stuffed beef. Classic braciole is stuffed with breadcrumbs and cheese. Ours will use string beans, polenta and fig jam. When you slice it, you will have the most beautiful cross section of golden polenta contrasting with the beautiful green of the beans and the rich brown meat. You will actually get two for one with this recipe; the string beans with fig sauce can stand on their own as a side dish. To accompany the braciole, we will make cauliflower couscous, and vegetarian kishka. So, enjoy and have a delicious new year! I would be happy to respond to any questions. You can contact me at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Braciole...My Way
Green Beans with Fig Jam
Cauliflower Couscous
Vegetarian Kishka 

 
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